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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
credit but i think it pite have been jim o'neill of goldman saks saying that they don't govern enough. that the politics have to get better. does that ring true to you at all? >> do you know he what he might have said. >> it is true of india but let me add it is true of every country. we can't have better governance. i don't think you should generalize. there are many states in india where there is good 2k3w06 earnance. the central government generally provides good governance but there are weaknesses. we need to identify those weaknesses and rectify them. how can anyone say that we have reached the acme of governance. obviously governance can improve. we need to learn, for example, from the japanese or the chinese how to execute a project on time without a cost overrun. >> rose: right. >> if there is one thing that i would like to learn is how do execute a large project without a cost overrun or a time overrun. >> rose: so why do you have cost overruns or time overruns? >> because of, we, we tolerate inefficiencies. we don't punish people enough. we don't hold people accountable. it
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
shrapnel designed to maim anyone standing by and jim avila has more. it's not hard to find out how to build one. >> reporter: it's not. investigators are learning more about the anatomy of the bombs and abc news confirming the common cooking appliance used in their construction was a midsize fager brand pressure cooker. unfortunately, the pot maker sells 50,000 a year of those in the united states. this is what remains of what investigators believe could be the crude but effective bomb used in boston. the american military knows them well. the pressure cooker bomb. homemade and designed to maim and kill. this video of military units detonating one in afghanistan posted on youtube. this one found on the internet from the streets of nepal. so common the department of defense handbook on spotting roadside bombs warns soldiers and marines to be on the lookout for that innocent pressure cooker and publications all over the internet teach the construction of a bomb made from mom's kitchen, why so popular? because pressure cookers seal so tightly and can be filled with nails and ball bearings and
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
of the other questions have been asked. mouest -- yesterday in tntitellige had a briefing by jim clapper on thedg goingforwd. he produced a chart which basically showed, started with fy 2012 and show the effects of the various -- the first sequester and the ongoing sequester, the president's budget and other things that have affected that. it was a very powerful chart. i would ask of you could check with him, perhaps, chart number 11. visual a similar breakdown of what your budget thes like, including sequester on an ongoing basis. what does it do if we don't do anything about it? filed the suit for richelieu -- i found this information to be ry important. the munitions in the amount of funds available. the hobbled to see that data over the next 10 years, building in different places. look at the chart and you'll see what i am saying. >> we will. on thisther comment will sequester and budget. know this as well as i do. one of the first things you have to do in this situation is deferred maintenance. that is not saving. a cost someone will have to pay in the future. i am sure you agree. >
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)